Eltono:
Line and Surface


French artist Eltono (1975) worked in Madrid for the last decade, and since 2010 lives in Beijing. He started his street art career with the usual tools of the trade – spray paint cans. After ten years of bombing, his practice diverged as he evolved his artistic style using acrylic paints and tape to develop an abstract geometric language.

Hardcover
96 pages
Edition of 1000
Size: 22 x 15.5 cm
ISBN: 9789081841801

Stickit 2012

Price: 24,95
Now: 19,50 Euro
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Line and Surface


The book Line and Surface is an unique overview of Eltono's work over the last twelve years. Eltono (1975) worked in Madrid for the last decade, and since 2010 lives in Beijing. He started with his abstract geometric style of street art in the late nineties. Over 250 photos show the diversity of Eltono's work. It also shows the solutions he has used to address the problems of showing public space art in exhibition venues.

Eltono grew up on the outskirts of Paris. He started his street art career with the usual tools of the trade - spray paint cans. After ten years of bombing, in 1999 his practice diverged as he evolved his artistic style using acrylic paints and tape to develop an abstract geometric language. Now the paintings of this prestigious yet humble artist can be found on the streets of more than seventyfive cities. He has shown his works in many world-renowned galleries and museums, including the Tate Modern and Fundacion Miró.

Power of simplicity
Editor Stickit: "I met Eltono in 2001. The abstract minimalist style of Eltono stood out for being unrelentingly original and instantly recognizable. I don't think that there is anybody else who can express so much with so little. The apparent simplicity of Eltono's work belies its power to evoke strange sensations. It's an honour to publish some of his work."

Neglected Surfaces
Eltono is known for his constructive criterion and his sensitivity to medium and location. He always improvises his forms and colours to integrate within the existing balance. He also chooses neglected surfaces with the intention of reviving their dignity and making use of their aged textures and abandoned states. Eltono wanted to create a street aesthetic which could open out to the entire world. That is why he created the simple geometric shapes. These abstract shapes are more than only a new variety of tagging, but a shift of practice to a more iconic rather than textual idiom.